Early Guitars and Vihuela

A network for historic guitars and vihuelas

Does anyone know the origin of the dispute?

I'm sure I can see Lars in the picture...

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Comment by Lars Hedelius-Strikkertsen on February 13, 2012 at 20:15

I know about the other pictures/paintings. I've posted them in my page. Do You have this book. I've allways wanted to get this book

Comment by Scot Tremblay on February 13, 2012 at 7:46

It's only those few (10 +/- measures, not even) in the second movement that give me a problem. But I haven't played it for quite a few years so maybe I should give it another go. I'll have to give the thumb thing a try again.

 

A colleague at university played this Sonata in her graduating recital and used her nose to fret the B and C notes. It was amusing to watch and earned her a colorful reputation amongst the students...not so much the professors. No sense of humor I guess.

 

Sometimes you have to get creative to get the job done. Giuliani might have approved of her technique, Sor would have been against it :)

 

My nose is too big, kept fretting too many strings,  so I played the Ponce Sonata Clasica instead, for my recital.

Comment by Lars Hedelius-Strikkertsen on February 13, 2012 at 6:16

You're taltally right Scott. Actually the first movement is not difficult at all. That goes for the rest of the piece if you can the bass notes B and C with the thumb in the 7th position.

Comment by Scot Tremblay on February 13, 2012 at 0:36

"I tend to avoid anything with the word 'Brilliant' on the title page."

 

Don't let that throw you. "Brilliant" is just a marketing ploy. Sell more copies if it sounds more special than it really is.

Comment by Rob MacKillop on February 12, 2012 at 23:20
That's Giuliani's opus 15. I tend to avoid anything with the word 'Brilliant' on the title page. Thumb or otherwise, I don't have the technique.
Comment by Lars Hedelius-Strikkertsen on February 12, 2012 at 23:03

sorry. I missed out some words, its late and I'm tired, You get the idea

Comment by Lars Hedelius-Strikkertsen on February 12, 2012 at 23:01

Scot. I've tried using the thumb in the piece by Giuliani in wich points out the use of the left thumb as a cellist. ( dont recall the opusno. on that piece. But it hurt like h.... I think one has to do it a lot to hardn the skin as the cellist do. Anyway, I've only tried it once. Guiliani did use his left hand thumb as Carulli, and quite often actually. I play his sonate op. and in the 2. and 3. movement you have to use the L H thumb. Otherwise its rather difficult to play. http://www.muslib.se/ebibliotek/boije/pdf/Boije%20154.pdf see examples in this link

Comment by Stuart Walsh on February 12, 2012 at 22:31

I thought it was nails/no nails?

Anyway, to reply to Rob,  who else used the thumb? The Russians on their slender, but 7-string, fingerboards. They used a special sign for it.

Comment by Scot Tremblay on February 12, 2012 at 22:30

I think it was Thomas Heck who was telling me about Giuliani slipping his thumb around to the front of the neck to play bass notes much as a cello player does. Afterall he was supposedly a fine cello player as well. Anyone tried that? My brief experiment with this technique resulted in my guitar almost crashing head first into the floor...well, not really. It just felt that way...maybe it takes more practice ;)

Comment by Lars Hedelius-Strikkertsen on February 12, 2012 at 21:27

Mertz

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