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Hello there,

      I have been looking for Vivaldi "Concerto in E minor Rv 277 Op11 No.2  il Favorito Andante.

      Anyone knows the music publisher who has this piece. I need the tablature as well.

      I don't seem to be able to find it.  please help if you know.

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As far as I know there is only one published score of this work, a violin concerto, in Gian Francesco Malipiero, editor, Le Opere di Antonio Vivaldi, Tomo 459  (Milan: Edizioni Ricordi)  www.ricordi.it 16.50 Euros.

 

The tomo number is essential when you order.  Other numbers for this work (it's a real mess) are Pincherle 106, RV 277, Fanno I #208, M 459, Op. 11 No. 2.

There's not lute or guitar in this work, so I donot understand why you expect tablature.

Thank you Arthur, thank you very much indeed.  Now I see the problem why I couldn't find it. I listen to this piece of music on CD and it has classical guitar accompany the other instruments.

    Oh well, I guess I just have to give it up.  The CD is by Gerald Garcia ( Who is chinese originally from Hong Kong), but the website has Gerald Garcia name on it. I e- mail him but got no reply.

      Once again thank you Arthur , wishing you a happy new year 2011

There is considerable evidence that guitars were used as continuo insruments in the orchestra.  SDome is from pictures in the theater when an opera is being performed.  The Boston Early Music Festival always uses guitars as contnuo in the opera performances.  Maybe you need to ask Garcia about the music (scores) tghat he used.  You should try again to reach him.

 

And Happy New Year to you. Yong Leong

I've heard quite a few Vivaldi recordings where they used the baroque guitar as a continuo instrument.  One of my first CDs had a very effective use of a baroque guitar in Vivaldi's Spring.  If I am not mistaken, it is by The academy of ancient music under Christopher Hogwood.

 

Strangely, even though Vivaldi wrote concertos for most available instruments in his time and place, he did not write for the guitar.

 

Well, if you want to play the guitar with a baroque orchestra, you have to get the continuo part (a single line usually written in bass clef - in modern editions it could be in the cello part - and carefully provide chords to go along with the upper parts.  Depending on the music style and your taste, you may prefer to play a few strummed chords or single plucked chords or maybe even a more elaborate accompaniment.  Things are easier when there is a thick layer of little numbers under or above the staff... they are very useful, but you should not expect Vivaldi to write too many of those... Italians liked to be not too specific on that.

 

Check on my page "Clarines Suaves"... that's more or less what you need to do.  Happy 2011.

'....you have to get the continuo part (a single line usually written in bass clef - in modern editions it could be in the cello part - and carefully provide chords to go along with the upper parts.  Depending on the
music style and your taste, you may prefer to play a few strummed chords
or single plucked chords or maybe even a more elaborate accompaniment. '

 

Very clearly put,  Juan 

 

And g ood luck with your search Yong.

This is where a background in  music theory and analysis pays off, especially  working out the chord structure underlying the music.  Think of song books where the chords are given above and  you fingerpick or strum an accompaniment according to taste. As an exercise you could find a chord sequence that you like (House of the Rising Sun is a nice one) then find 20 ways of playing and varying this  sequence.

Or try La Folia (which is  Dm  A  Dm  C ,   F  C  Dm  A  ; Dm  A  Dm  C ,   F  C  Dm/A  Dm )

As classical musicians we can get addicted to reading  the notes,  so it is liberating to have some elements of freedom

 

As an experiment you might try playing along with the cd and try to locate the chords yourself (a capo might help if it is in an awkward key)

Following up on Tonyyyy's "rising sun" idea... If you have jazz musicians among your friends, ask them about the "Real Book". Practically all jazz musicians are acquainted with that book and many of them work every single day from that book.  You will find an amazing number of lead sheets. I'm sure you will know quite a few songs.

Learn how jazz musicians work from a lead sheet (which is actually all they need) and try to play with them... if they let you.  It's in a very different idiom, but that should give you an idea. Don't expect this to be easy;  a lead sheet, like a continuo line, is intended for advanced musicians. Doing this is good for your improvisation skills. You will learn the importance of keeping a steady tempo (many of us classically trained guitarists are notoriously bad at this) and if you do it right, you will have fun. You might prefer not to use a mike... at first we classically trained musicians sound stiff and somehow silly.

 

Then try checking a good harmony book -one that discusses baroque music- to see how to read the little numbers under the bass part.  You will see that the baroque continuo marks are not that different from what you get in a lead sheet... actually, continuo numbers are sometimes even more informative because they include which chord inversion sounds best. Then, try again with your new skills.

Now, if you really want to go into continuo, look for a a period source for the music of your interest (Italian?).  I like Spanish and Latin American Baroque, so the best I've found so far is Torres:

http://bdh.bne.es/bnesearch/CompleteSearch.do?text=&field2Op=AN...

 

Good Luck and happy new year.

A few years ago I did some duets with another guitarist. He liked Vivaldi and Handel. I remember working from the orchestral score writing out the bass , working out the chord  structure and finding and writing out something comfortable and idiomatic for guitar. The C clefs that the cellos and violas played drove me crazy.  My friend just had to play the tune!

I can work out figured bass but i  couldnt play automatically from it. It feels safe to have a score in front of me , though I think I would be more flexible now and improvise  a bit from my  written basis

 

i remember one problem with playing along with cds is they were often in A=415, which meant tuning down a semitone

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