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line 6, bar 3.

I'm curious to know if anyone has a suggestion how to performe this and what kind of technique is to be used.

When i play it I stroke the first chord with my thumb and then pluck the two following with m i. But I find it a bit difficult to get it up in the same tempo as the rest of the movement. Maybe I'm doing it wrong or perhaps I simply just have to practise it some more.

Here's the link

http://statensmusikverk.se/musikochteaterbiblioteket/ladda-ner-note...

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Keep practising! :-)

On the other hand, so to speak, is this an instance of Sor's strumming notation? Cf opus 54.

PS it's one of the few Sor compositions I really have no wish to play. Just never got into it. But I've never heard you play it, Lars. Convince me! :-)

Rob! I'll do my very best :-) I must practice then. I'm just one of these people that just want to play instead of practice. Things normally comes easy to me but this technique I have to practice to get it right, bugger! :-)

Well! of to practice :-)

Hi Lars

I'd do what you do, use the thumb for the chord (so, strummed) - m - i. But very lightly. First get the speed and coordination right, then the sound volume.

Thanks for the advise. Another thing that I struggle a bit with is the right hand littlefinger. Should it still rest on the soundboaard as I strum or not. If I lift the littlefinger from the soundboard my arm tends to move too much and playing m and i afterwards gets difficult. If I do rest the Littlefinger my thumb dosnt hit the first and second string. But then again it could be a pratice issue. I will se how it goes

I've heard this section (I think you're refering to the sextuplets about half way down the first page...) played as a continous rasquado, a la Flamenco triplet pmipmi...( p upstroke, m downstroke, i down...). I thought it was very effective and didn't seem out of place. But take into consideration, I was in Cordoba, Spain at the time so any rasquados on a guitar didn't seem out of place...everybody was strumming away! ;)

 

The performer (I cannot remember who it was at the moment...old age setting in) suggested that because of Sors background and having been exposed to the folk and early flamenco styles of his home land it was a distinct probability that this was how he himself would have played it. I don't really have an opinion one way or the other but it was the best rendition of this, IMO, rather cumbersome piece that I think I've ever heard.

 

 

 

 

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