Early Guitars and Vihuela

A network for historic guitars and vihuelas

4-course chitarrino by Andrew Hartig, 38.5 cm mensur. Inspired by model by Giovanni Smit, Milan, 1646 (Kunsthistoriches Museum, Vienna). Walnut back and sides, maple neck and headstock, sitka spruce top, and pearwood pegs.

Photo by Tony Rinella, as featured on the cover of Lute Society of America Quarterly, Volume XLV, No. 3, Fall 2010.

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Comment by Akira Sakamoto on August 29, 2011 at 7:30
Andrew, thank you for the explanation.  Yes, it is a nice taro-patch uke!
Comment by Valéry Sauvage on August 29, 2011 at 6:00

"That's about the length of the average Ukulele!"

nice taro-patch (taro-patch is the double strunged ukulele)

Comment by Andrew Hartig on August 29, 2011 at 3:47
It was fretted in 1/6 comma meantone, hence the large 1st fret space.
Comment by Akira Sakamoto on August 29, 2011 at 2:01

Very neat instrument!  Did you omit the first fret, or apply some special intonation?

Comment by Andrew Hartig on August 23, 2011 at 15:53
Yes, 38.5cm -- very short. I was inspired by the instrument by Giovanni Smit dated 1646, but I actually scaled the size of the instrument up(!) from his, which had a string length around 37cm I believe...
Comment by Michael. N. on August 23, 2011 at 14:48
It's in his description Diego. 38.5 cm's. That's about the length of the average Ukulele!
Comment by Diego Cantalupi on August 23, 2011 at 14:05
Nice instrument! How log are the strings?
Comment by Jelma van Amersfoort on August 23, 2011 at 12:19

I love it :-)

Comment by Michael. N. on August 23, 2011 at 12:09
Very attractive instrument.

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